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Interviews

Lloyd Langford Interview



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Now in its third year, the Machynlleth Comedy Festival brings some of the finest stand-up acts from the UK to the Mid Wales town of Machynlleth during the first weekend of May which this year includes Stewart Lee, Richard Herring, Josie Long and John Richardson.

 

Alongside the names above will be Baglan comedian Lloyd Langford who has come to prominence as a regular panelist on the BBC One show Ask Rhod Gilbert. We caught up with Lloyd to chat about his latest show, One Day in the Life of Lloyd Owen Langford.

 

Tell us a bit about the show you’ll be performing at Machynlleth

It's my new show for 2012, entitled One Day In The Life of Lloyd Owen Langford. Imagine 24 but replace Jack Bauer with a slightly confused Welsh bloke. I don't judo chop any terrorists in the throat but I do gently mock a prominent boxer.

When did you realise you wanted to become a stand-up comedian?

About two months into university. I was 18 years old and I saw a gig with Chris Addison and Francesca Martinez. I had a whale of a time in the audience but had a notion that it would be more fun to be on the stage.

Which comedians have influenced you most?

There's tons. Here's a few: Harry Hill, Craig Campbell, Leslie Nielsen, Rhod Gilbert, Andy Zaltzman and Coconut Lady.

How much does being Welsh influence your comedy?

I get heckled with sheep noises more often.

How competitive is the world of stand-up?

I guess it's as competitive as you want it to be. I don't really enjoy the machismo, **** swinging element of it so I try to avoid that. I entered a few competitions when I was starting out but it's not something I'd do now. I'd rather work with people than against them.

Is performing stand-up a lonely profession?

I think it can be. It's important to have a balance of work and social stuff; either that or just a 100% devotion to work, a strong broadband connection and a constantly replenished hipflask.

Do you worry about being funny?

I don't sit at home fretting about it but I think when you're writing new stuff, you can't really be sure it's any good until you've performed it in front of an audience. If you look at it that way, every joke is a work in progress.

What's the worst gig you've ever played?

It was many years ago at Plymouth University. Pin drop silence for 20 minutes. The front row couldn't speak English. It cost me more to get there than I got paid. I chalk that one down as ‘character building’.

When was the last time you heard a joke and thought 'I wish I wrote that'?

Steven Wright is the man for that. "There's a fine line between fishing and just standing on the shore like an idiot." Brilliant.

If you couldn't perform stand-up anymore, what profession would you turn your hand to and why?

Welsh TV weatherman. You work for three minutes a day and if you report that it’s going to rain, no one cares and if you report it’s going to be sunny, the entire country wants to have sex with you. In both senses, it's a low pressure job.

Michael Took was asking the questions.